Truth Be Told: Mayweather-Pacquiao

After five years of buildup, posturing, and casting a cloud over the sport of boxing,  on Saturday night Floyd Mayweather and Manny Pacquiao finally stepped into the same ring, tapped gloves and fought. The fight–maybe a bit behind on its sell-by date, but still relevant enough to draw the eyes of the world–solved a question people have been arguing about in bars and gyms, with friends and with anonymous strangers on internet forums. Mayweather, or Pacquao?

The buildup to the fight felt strange to those of us following this selfish saga for years. We all know what happened: thinking the fight was going to happen in 2010, only for negotiations to be derailed over drug testing, egos and a dick measuring contest, to knowledgable boxing fans thinking the fight would never happen, to tepid PPV sales for both stars leading them to finally put pen to paper and get in the ring together. The announcement of the fight itself blew up the internet on the Friday night the news dropped, and boxing fans (causal and diehard alike) spent the next couple of months with a perpetual hard on.

As this is boxing, some things were shaky in the leadup. Mayweather Promotions, who was leading the promotion of the event, proved themselves amateurish in the lead-up, not making tickets available until just before the fight itself and getting into very public spats with prominent reporters. Floyd’s dark past of domestic violence, not new news, suddenly got a very large and public spotlight shined on it, and the general public was not as forgiving as the hardcore boxing fans, spanning numerous thinkpieces, talking head fodder and even calls to boycott the fight itself.

Boxing is a sport living on the fringes of American society, a sport smoking a cigarette in the shadows of a dumpster in a city alley.  This sport doesn’t look so great in the daylight, and with the attention of the larger country turned to it, the ugliness was magnified.

Regardless, it was one of the few times boxing served as a cultural moment. That said, the fight itself meant most to the boxing fans–one of the few times in recent memory the sport has allowed us to answer the question of who the best might be. And at the end of the day, regardless of all of the ancillary stories, thinkpieces and uneducated opinions, that question was answered.

Fight Recap: Floyd Mayweather UD12 Manny Pacquiao

Sometime the Wolf score: Mayweather 116-112 Pacquiao

The fight itself was a disappointment for a lot of people watching at home. The vast majority of fans put their support behind the Filipino sensation, saving their venom for the undefeated American and hoping for some fireworks. Alas, the fight ended up being a typical bout for boxing’s king, as Floyd Mayweather (48-0, 26 KO) dominated his opponent throughout and never looked hurt, cruising to an easy decision. Though Manny Pacquiao (57-6-2, 38 KO) occasionally had his moments where he looked alive and made Floyd cover up, he didn’t look like his typical dynamo self. Most of that had to do with the man standing in front of him.

Floyd was clearly the bigger man, but he also had a distinct advantage in speed, which was surprising, as Manny has built his career on powerful shots at blazing speed from strange angles. Pacquiao found himself in the unfamiliar position of punching at air–and occasionally taking a sharp right hand that rattled his brain and stopped him in his tracks. After a feeling-out first round in which Pacquiao landed only three punches, there were multiple times where Manny would wildly lunge in and swing a prayer shot, hoping to somehow catch the master of defense off guard.

Floyd was careful, perhaps even moreso than usual, and had respect for Manny’s power–in a few rounds, such as the fourth, Manny would land a nice shot to Floyd’s head and Floyd would just cover up against the ropes and absorb his opponent’s shots, content to let Manny get off and just get out of the round. These spots were few and far between, as every time Pacquiao started to get some momentum, Floyd would take control back.

We gave Manny four rounds. That was, in my opinion, the most rounds you could possibly give him. Floyd dominated this fight even more so than our 116-112 reflects. He was clearly the better man in the ring. He would’ve been five years ago as well–Floyd is only faster than he was then. And though the viewing public didn’t like it, at least we don’t have to argue hypotheticals anymore. You don’t have to enjoy it, but sometimes, the truth is ugly.

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